Assessment for learning

Here’s one of my latest assignments for uni. We had to undertake a depth study on an issue of our choice; mine was looking at assessment “for” learning. Enjoy!

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3 responses to “Assessment for learning

  1. Pingback: Assessment for learning | Creativity, Innovation, and Change | Scoop.it

  2. Excellent. It takes one brick at a time Chris. I believe, as you do, that the system can change, must change and inevitably will change. If for no other reason but necesity. Your battle lines are drawn – good luck. Im sure you will do well, and dont lose sight or hope of the things that can be achieved.

  3. From your presentation, you are suggesting quite a large change in the way most teachers run their classrooms. While it may be true that these changes may be the best for learning, it is not clear to me that they are practical. For example:

    1) Giving frequent formative assessments for a full-size class (i.e. 25- 30 students), reading them, and giving grades/feedback on them seems impossible without the use of multiple choice questions. MC might not be the best, but it is about the only way to get data back in time to use it.

    2) Letting students choose their assessment tasks seems impossible to grade if there are 15 different formats submitted. Also, is possible to adequately assess a students’ understanding of equilibrium by having them write a song about it?

    While I get the idea behind these reforms, and I’m not allergic to work, I don’t see how any of these reforms can be managed without an inordinate amount of time spent by the teacher, especially on a block schedule (when every night = 2 regular school nights). The result = exclusion of all personal/family activities and burnout within 5 years.

    Some of the the things we use in teaching are artifacts of it being an inherently non-ideal environment for learning. One teacher alone (without significant computerized help) cannot possible be responsible for the authentic assessment of 30 children (x 3-5 classes depending on where you teach).

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